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Where Are Ray Ban Sunglasses Made?

Many people want to know where their Ray-Bans are made. The question is legit, just like the raising concerns. That’s because many models carry the Made in China label. And people tend to think that they’re fake just because of that.

In this article, we’re going to shade some light on this common question and, also, teach you how to spot a fake model. To kill the suspense, Ray-Ban was bought by Luxottica years ago, and the Italian company does have factories in China.

3016, 3364, 3386, 3267, 3119, 3484, 8310, 2168F and 4125F are just a few of the Ray-Ban models manufactured in China. Is there anything else you need to know?

 

A few words on where are the Ray Ban sunglasses made

Ever since 1937, Ray-Ban has been an iconic American brand. Still, not everyone is aware that throughout their history, these classic sunglasses haven’t been manufactured in USA only. For instance, in 1999, Bausch & Lomb decided to sell the business to a big Italian player. Luxottica bought Ray-Ban and, as a giant Italian eyewear manufacturer, it organized the production right there, in Italy.

Once the company itself opened new facilities in other countries, the production of Ray-Bans was moved to those new facilities. So comes that today, one will most likely find Ray-Bans manufactured either in Italy, or in China. The producer vouches for the quality of the ones made in China, which rely on the same machines and techniques as the ones in Italy.

One thing you can be sure of is that anytime someone will show you a pair of Ray-Bans and tell you they’re from Bausch & Lomb, made in America, you have all the reasons to be skeptical. Those are either fakes, or you’re actually standing in front of a pair of vintage frames!

 

Practical tips on how to tell if your Ray-Bans are real

Knowing that Luxottica actually runs factories in China should tell you one thing – just because a pair of Ray Bans is labeled as Made in China, it does not mean you should consider it a fake. To tell if a pair is the real deal or not, you shouldn’t be looking at where it’s made. Instead, pay attention to the following details:

 

The price is still a reliable indicator of quality

Luxottica is making the Ray-Bans and allowing various sellers to take them to various markets. However, it’s still Luxottica the one that dictates how low the price can go. Typically, they go on sale on a discount of 30%, tops! If you’re seeing a bigger discount, it’s either a discontinued model, or a fake one!

 

The logo should be legit and accurate

Knowing that Ray-Bans switched from Bausch & Lomb to Luxottica, you can expect some differences. Specifically, the older models, the ones from before 2000 when Luxottica took over the production, had the BL logo. It was the company’s owner logo, imprinted on their products.

Once the owner changed, so did the logo. Modern Ray-Bans have their logo both etched on the lenses and attached to the temple. Some even have it on the nose pads. Needless to say, wherever you find it, it should feature a quality paint that won’t scratch. If you can easily remove the logo, it’s a clear sign they are fakes.

 

The sunglasses should be of high quality

Sturdy and built with attention to detail, Ray-Ban sunglasses look and feel outstanding. Original models have a solid frame and glass lenses, with metal hinges that let you easily open or close them. The hinges typically come with interlocking teeth, too.

Whether a pair of Ray-Bans is too lightweight, or its lenses are made of cheap plastic, or they come with bolted-on hinges, again, they’re most likely fakes.

 

The packaging should be flawless

As mentioned, these sunglasses are all about quality reflected in every detail. If you’re noticing anything suspicious about them, or if the booklet they come with includes spelling errors or it is made of cheap paper, you may unfortunately be looking at a fake model.

 

The seller should be reliable

As with any other online purchase, if you bought yours from a shady website rather than a licensed retailer, the risks are even higher. Whether the website or the price doesn’t seem trustworthy, you’re looking at a big red flag.